SEX SLAVE, BUYING AND SELLING

Sexual slavery and sexual exploitation is attaching the right of ownership over one or more people with the intent of coercing or otherwise forcing them to engage in sexual activities. This include forced labor, reducing a person to a servile status (including forced marriage) and sex trafficking persons, such as the sexual trafficking of persons.

The crime also includes forced marriages, domestic servitude or other forced labour that ultimately involves forced sexual activity. In contrast to the crime of rape, which is a completed offence, sexual slavery constitutes a continuing offence. … Forms of sexual slavery can, for example, be practices such as the detention of women in “rape camps” or “comfort stations”, forced temporary “marriages” to soldiers and other practices involving the treatment of women as chattel, and as such, violations of the peremptory norm prohibiting slavery.

Commercial sexual exploitation of adults:

Commercial sexual exploitation of adults (often referred to as “sex trafficking” is a type of human trafficking involving the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of people, by coercive or abusive means for the purpose of sexual exploitation. Commercial sexual exploitation is not the only form of human trafficking and estimates vary as to the percentage of human trafficking which is for the purpose of transporting someone into sexual slavery.

Commercial sexual exploitation of children:

Commercial sexual exploitation of children (CSEC) includes child prostitution (or child sex trafficking), child sex tourism, child pornography, or other forms of transactional sex with children. The Youth Advocate Program International (YAPI) describes CSEC as a form of coercion and violence against children and a contemporary form of slavery.

Types of Sex Slavery:

  1. Child prostitution- Child prostitution, or child sex trafficking, is a form of sexual slavery. It is the commercial sexual exploitation of children, in which a child performs the services of prostitution, usually for the financial benefit of an adult. In some parts of the world, child prostitution is tolerated or ignored by the authorities. Reflecting an attitude which prevails in many developing countries, a judge from Honduras said, on condition of anonymity: “If the victim [the child prostitute] is older than 12, if he or she refuses to file a complaint and if the parents clearly profit from their child’s commerce, we tend to look the other way”.

2.Child sex tourism- Child sex tourism is a form child sex trafficking, and is mainly centred on buying and selling children into sexual slavery. It is when an adult travels to a foreign country for the purpose of engaging in commercially facilitated child sexual abuse. Child sex tourism results in both mental and physical consequences for the exploited children, who may include “disease (including HIV/AIDS), drug addiction, pregnancy, malnutrition, social ostracism, and possibly death”, accord to the State Department of the United States. Thailand, Cambodia, India, Brazil and Mexico have been identified as leading hotspots of child sexual exploitation.

3.Cybersex trafficking- Victims of cybersex trafficking, primarily women and children, are sex slaves who are trafficked and then forced to perform in live streaming] shows involving coerced sex acts or rape on webcam. They are usually made to watch the paying consumers on shared screens and follow their orders. It occurs in ‘cybersex dens,’ which are rooms equipped with webcams.

4. Forced marriage- A forced marriage is a marriage where one or both participants are married, without their freely given consent. Forced marriage is a form of sexual slavery. Causes for forced marriages include customs such as bride price and dowry; poverty; the importance given to female premarital virginity; “family honour”; the fact that marriage is considered in certain communities a social arrangement between the extended families of the bride and groom; limited education and economic options; perceived protection of cultural or religious traditions; assisting immigration.

Health Implications:

Victims of sex trafficking are likely exposed to adverse conditions that can negatively affect their physical, mental, and emotional health. Physicians, nurses, midwives, and other healthcare providers can play critical roles in helping to identify victims of sex trafficking as a first step in providing both assistance and advocacy for affected women and girls. As a provider, one can play an essential role in providing interventions to improve physical and psychological health among victims and advocating on behalf of victims to help improve their social circumstances.

  1. Physical- Sex trafficking victims are particularly susceptible to sexually transmitted infections such as gonorrhoea, syphilis, urinary tract infections, and pubic lice. Human immunodeficiency virus/ AIDS infection is known to be prevalent. They may experience pelvic pain, vaginal/anal tearing, rectal trauma, and/or urinary difficulties as a result of commercial sex work. Sex trafficking victims are often physically abused and tortured. Providers should screen women and girls for physical injuries such as broken bones, bruises, burns, scars, and broken teeth/ dental problems.
  2. Psychological-Victims of sex trafficking may face moderate to severe psychological trauma from daily mental, emotional, and psychological abuse and torture. Post-traumatic stress disorder, acute anxiety, and depression are all common psychological issues among sex industry workers.
  3. Social- Although there are insufficient data that report the social effects of sex trafficking, anecdotal evidence suggests that victims have a greater prevalence of illiteracy, homelessness, poverty, and societal isolation. Trafficked women engaging in sex work tend to have fewer resources, limited options, and increased vulnerability to violence and abuse than women who are not trafficked.

conclusion:

Victims of sex trafficking acquire adverse physical and psychological health conditions and social disadvantages. Thus, sex trafficking is a critical health issue with broader social implications that requires both medical and legal attention. Healthcare professionals can work to improve the screening, identification, and assistance of victims of sex trafficking in a clinical setting and help these women and girls access legal and social services.

 Sex trafficking involves some form of forced or coerced sexual exploitation that is not limited to prostitution, and has become a significant and growing problem in both the United States and the larger global community. The costs to society include the degradation of human and women’s rights, poor public health, disrupted communities, and diminished social development.

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