INDIAN STREET FOOD

Indian street foods are known worldwide for their taste, diversity and easy accessibility in various cities like Mumbai, Delhi, Kolkata and Bangalore to name a few. Few street dishes like kathi rolls, daulat ki chaat, chhole bhature and misal pav are quite famous. When it comes to street food, India tops the charts.

The biggest reason that we all loves to eat street food is that it’s way more economical or cheap than the food of Restaurants/Hotels. Street Food is very economical for the middle-class people and that’s why the major chunk of that class prefers street food the most.

Indian street food has a long history. On the streets of Delhi, you can visit kebab vendors who used to serve the Mughal kings. In Kolkata, you’ll find fusion street food that was created with British customers in mind during colonial times.

According to a 2007 study from the Food and Agriculture Organization, 2.5 billion people eat street food every day. A majority of middle-income consumers rely on the quick access and cheap service of street food for daily nutrition and job opportunities, especially in developing countries.

Cities which are popular for  Street Food in India

DELHI. Streets in Old Delhi are immensely popular for succulent kababs, greesy paranthas, crispy golgappas, syrupy jalebis, and lip-smacking chaat. …

KOLKATA. The City of Joy is known for tasty and surprisingly cheaper street food. …

LUCKNOW is famous for different types of jaben and Mughal dishes

MUMBAI – for vada pav , misal pav etc

AMRITSAR – lassi , chole bhature

HYDERABAD  – for birayani

AHMEDABAD – gujrati snacks like dhokla , patra ,etc

INDORE.

When it comes to mouth-watering varieties of street food in India, Kolkata is a winner. Beating Mumbai, Amritsar, Ahmedabad, and New Delhi, Kolkata has been deemed as the best destination for a staggering variety of street food, according to the survey ‘Taste of Travel’ mentioned in a report in The Times of India.

The fast food industry in India has evolved with the changing lifestyles of the young Indian population.[citation needed] The variety of gastronomic preferences across the regions, hereditary or acquired, has brought about different modules across the country.

Many of the traditional dishes have been adapted to suit the emerging fast food outlets. The basic adaptation is to decrease the processing and serving time. For example, the typical meal which called for being served by an ever-alert attendant is now offered as a Mini-Meal across the counter. In its traditional version, a plate or a banana leaf was first laid down on the floor or table. Several helpers then waited on the diner, doling out different dishes and refilling as they got over in the plate.

In the fast-food version, a plate already arranged with a variety of cooked vegetables and curries along with a fixed quantity of rice and Indian flatbreads is handed out across the counter against a prepaid coupon. The curries and breads vary depending on the region and local preferences. The higher priced ones may add a sweet to the combination. Refills are generally not offered.

It is common to serve different cuisines at different counters within the same premises. Presence of a large vegetarian population, who eschew non-vegetarian food, has given rise to outlets which exclusively serve vegetarian fast food. Also, different variety of food may be served depending on the times of the day. Beverages such coffee, tea, soft drinks and fruit juices may also be served in such outlets. Some outlets may additionally have specially designed counters for ice-cream, chaats etc.

Famous street food

• Chhole Bhature.
• momos
• spring rolls
• Bharwa Bhindi.
• Pindi Chana.
• Masala Chai.
• Samosa.
• Kulche.
• Panipuri/Golgappe/Phuchka. …
• Jalebi.

Categories: News